Unacceptable Conduct

Show Racism the Red Card calls upon supporters of all clubs to refrain from singing songs and participating in behaviour that contravenes footballing regulations as outlined by FIFA, UEFA and the SPL and that may result in possible prosecution from the police.

Show Racism the Red Card calls upon supporters of all clubs to refrain from singing songs and participating in behaviour that contravenes footballing regulations as outlined by FIFA, UEFA and the SPL and that may result in possible prosecution from the police.

We refer to "The Famine Song" which is being sung by sections of the Rangers support. We are of the opinion that this song is racist. Both Rangers Football Club and Strathclyde Police have stated that anyone singing this song risked being arrested. UEFA guidelines stipulate that "racial abuse" or "discrimination" is not confined to skin colour. It can also be reflected in abuse for being foreign or from an ethnic minority background.

The focus is often on the behaviour of Old Firm fans but we also refer to songs that 'celebrate' the Ibrox disaster and incite death threats against players that are often sung by fans of other clubs. We believe that all of these songs have no place in football or society. We welcome the recent statements from both Rangers and Celtic relating to these matters.

With the support from clubs across the country football fans have greatly improved their behaviour over the years but we cannot be complacent. History tells us that supporters will always taunt each other. But when songs and behaviour are racist and encourage acts of violence we all must make a stance and eradicate it from football and society.

Show Racism the Red Card will continue to work with football clubs, supporters groups and communities throughout Scotland. Our education programmes in schools will hopefully ensure that future generations will not indulge in unsporting and unlawful behaviour. To paraphrase a famous quote we look forward to a day when people will be judged on the content of their character and not on the colour of their skin or their country of origin.